Research Says Vegan Diet Leads To Better Cardiovascular Health. Is It The Best Diet To Follow?

According to a study, a plant-based diet is the most beneficial for health and sustainability.

by Tejashee Kashyap
Research Says Vegan Diet Leads To Better Cardiovascular Health. Is It The Best Diet To Follow?

Opting for a vegan diet is a lifestyle rooted in ethical, environmental, and health considerations. A variety of factors, including taste, intrapersonal and interpersonal dynamics influence the process of choosing food. According to a study, a plant-based diet is the most beneficial for health and sustainability.

Can A Vegan Diet Improve Health?

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The debate over whether a vegan diet is the best type is multifaceted and often subjective. According to a study, long-term flexitarians (FXs) consumed 50 grams of meat or meat products. Vegans, on the other hand, abstained from all animal products, and omnivores, who consumed 170 grams of meat and meat products daily, made up the second group. Blood samples were tested for some cardiovascular disease (CVD) indicators, blood pressure, arterial wall compliance, and the presence of metabolic syndrome (MetS). Since CVD causes more than half of all fatalities worldwide, it is the leading cause of death.

According to ecologists, there is no better diet for humanity than a plant-based one when it comes to sustainability and health. Instead of taking an all-or-nothing stance, people may find a happy medium where they eat mostly plant-based foods with occasional amounts of meat and processed meat. This kind of person is called a flexitarian as opposed to a vegetarian. A plant-based diet seems to lower the risk of CVDs, whereas the conventional omnivore diet has been linked to an elevated risk of CVDs. Nevertheless, the effect of a flexitarian diet on the risk of CVD has not been thoroughly studied up to now.

Also Read: Rise Of Vegan Parenting: Indian Families Jump On The Bandwagon Of Raising Vegan Kids

Is It A Better Diet?

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Photo Credits: Canva

Vegans were shown to have the highest quality diet, followed by flexitarians, which is consistent with other findings. While all groups’ levels of CVD indicators were comparable, vegans had the lowest fasting glucose levels. Vegans and FXs had considerably higher MetS marker values than omnivores, but all groups had low-risk score levels. The best cardiovascular health seems to be linked to a vegan diet. However, flexitarians had better MetS and arterial stiffness than the other groups. Therefore, when compared to omnivorous eating habits, flexitarian diets also provide several noteworthy advantages.

The key is to make informed choices that prioritise personal health and well-being. This should be done while considering the broader impact on animals, the environment, and society as a whole. What do you think?

Cover image credits: Canva